Siem Reap Attractive Sights & Ancient Temples

Siem Reap is the city starting point for excursions to Angkor Wat. Only a few kilometers north of the city sits one of the worlds most impressive temple grounds - with a whole collection of significant and very distinct temples. Perhaps it is rather no surprise that sights in the city are rather limited in comparsion the World heritage nearby. However Siem Reap is worth exploring, not only for the bustling bars, cafes and atmosphere (tourism has brought realtive wealth to this district) but also for such sights as the floating village on Tonle Sap lake, (the lake shoreline changes dramatically between the wet and dry seasons, so the floating village moves with it) as well as the Silk Farm out past the airport, West Baray - a man-made lake just past the airport (catch a boat to the island where there are ruins and a small contemporary Buddhist shrine) and the war and landmine museum, also near the airport. This is a stark reminder of the tragedies of the 1970s and early 1980s. Further out from town are the Koulen Mountains - where there are waterfalls: though be warned, tourists are changed a steep admission. 

Sun Set at Bakheng Mountain

Siem Reap is the city starting point for excursions to Angkor Wat. Only a few kilometers north of the city sits one of the worlds most impressive temple grounds - with a whole collection of significant and very distinct temples. Perhaps it is rather no surprise that sights in the city are rather limited in comparsion the World heritage nearby. However Siem Reap is worth exploring, not only for the bustling bars, cafes and atmosphere (tourism has brought realtive wealth to this district) but also for such sights as the floating village on Tonle Sap lake, (the lake shoreline changes dramatically between the wet and dry seasons, so the floating village moves with it) as well as the Silk Farm out past the airport, West Baray - a man-made lake just past the airport (catch a boat to the island where there are ruins and a small contemporary Buddhist shrine) and the war and landmine museum, also near the airport. This is a stark reminder of the tragedies of the 1970s and early 1980s. Further out from town are the Koulen Mountains - where there are waterfalls: though be warned, tourists are changed a steep admission.

Angkor Wat

Is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built for King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century as his state temple and capital city.

As the best-preserved temple at the site, it is the only one to have remained a significant religious centre since its foundation first Hindu, dedicated to Vishnu, then Buddhist. The temple is the epitome of the high classical style of Khmer architecture. It has become a symbol of Cambodia, appearing on its national flag, and it is the country's prime attraction for visitors. Angkor Wat combines two basic plans of Khmer temple architecture: the temple mountain and the later galleried temple. Probably the reason why tourists come to Siem Reap in the first place. Most people have heard and read about Angkor Wat, but a visit is a must! Visit the magnificent Angkor temple complex, built between the 9th and 13th centuries by the Khmer Empire. In the morning, visit the Roluos Temple Group, then return to Siem Reap for lunch. In the afternoon, spend two and a half hours touring majestic Angkor Wat before climbing up to Phnom Bakheng to enjoy a magnificent sunset over Angkor and its surroundings.

Floating Village

South of Siem Reap is Tonle Sap lake which feeds the Tonle Sap river that joins Siem Reap to Phnom Penh.

Incredibly the river flows South during the wet season, then switches direction during the dry season and feeds into Tonle Sap lake. The shoreline shifts dramatically, and the floating village provides locals with a constant presence on the water - for fishing and their livelihood. In fact not only are there houseboats here, but a school, market stalls and bars. The village is mainly peopled by folk of Vietnamese extraction. To get here, take a tuk tuk - it is an 18 minute ride from Siem Reap - and then catch a ferry which will take you out onto the lake past the village. Bring a camera, and stop off at one of the bars - one of them has crocodiles and a very large snake to drape around your neck.

Bayon Temples

The Bayon is a well-known and richly decorated Khmer temple at Angkor in Cambodia. Built in the late 12th century or early 13th century as the official state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII, the Bayon stands at the centre of Jayavarman's capital, Angkor Thom.

Following Jayavarman's death, it was modified and augmented by later Hindu and Theravada Buddhist kings in accordance with their own religious preferences. The Bayon's most distinctive feature is the multitude of serene and massive stone faces on the many towers which jut out from the upper terrace and cluster around its central peak.The temple is known also for two impressive sets of bas-reliefs, which present an unusual combination of mythological, historical, and mundane scenes.

Preah Khan

Preah Khan is one of the few monuments to have kept its original name. The founding stele is written entirely in Sanskrit with the name of the temple expressed as Jayacri. During the Middle Period, a stupa was erected in place of Lokesvara in the central sanctuary.

This had the advantage of symbolising Buddhism in all its forms. The name Jayacri or Preah Khan means "sacred sword" which was at the same time the coronation name of its royal constructor. More than a single temple , the monument was in its time a real city with a whole population divided according to their functions. The temple was also a site of Buddhist studies with its retinue of spiritual masters and their disciples. Preah Khan is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built in the 12th century for King Jayavarman VII.

It is located northeast of Angkor Thom and just west of the Jayatataka baray, with which it was associated. It was the centre of a substantial organisation, with almost 100,000 officials and servants. The temple is flat in design, with a basic plan of successive rectangular galleries around a Buddhist sanctuary complicated by Hindu satellite temples and numerous later additions. Like the nearby Ta Prohm, Preah Khan has been left largely unrestored, with numerous trees and other vegetation growing among the ruins.

Beng Melea Temple

Beng Melea was built as hinduist temple, but there are some carvings depicting buddhist motifs. Its primary material is sandstone and it is largely unrestored, with trees and thick brush thriving amidst its towers and courtyards and many of its stones lying in great heaps. For years it was difficult to reach, but a road recently built to the temple complex of Koh Ker passes Beng Mealea and more visitors are coming to the site, as it is 77 km from Siem Reap by road.
The history of the temple is unknown and it can be dated only by its architectural style, identical to Angkor Wat, so scholars presume it was built during the reign of king Suryavarman II in the early 12th century. Smaller in size than Angkor Wat, the king's main monument, Beng Mealea nonetheless ranks among the Khmer empire's larger temples. It was the center of a town, surrounded by a moat 1025 m by 875 m large and 45 m wide.

Beng Mealea is oriented toward the east, but has entranceways from the other three cardinal directions. The basic layout is three enclosing galleries around a central sanctuary, collapsed at present. The enclosures are tied with "cruciform cloisters", like Angkor Wat. Structures known as libraries lie to the right and left of the avenue that leads in from the east. There is extensive carving of scenes from Hindu mythology, including the Churning of the Sea of Milk and Vishnu being borne by the bird god Garuda. Causeways have long balustrades formed by bodies of the seven-headed Naga serpent.

Bantey Srei Temple

Banteay Srei (or Banteay Srey) is a 10th century Cambodian  temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Located in the area of Angkor in Cambodia, at 13.5989 N, 103.9628 E, it lies near the hill of Phnom Dei, 25 km (15 miles) north-east of the main group of temples that once belonged to the medieval capitals of Yasodharapura and Angkor Thom. Banteay Srei is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today. The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a "precious gem", or the "jewel of Khmer art”.

Koh Ker Temple

The temple complex at Koh Ker, northeast of Siem Reap, represents the remnants of the capital of the Khmer Empire from 928 AD. - 944 A.D. - a very unique period in the Age of Angkor. From the time the Khmer capital was first moved to the Angkor area in the late 9th century, it would remain there for almost 500 years, with one brief interruption. Just a few decades after the establishment at Angkor, there was a disruption in the royal succession for reasons that remain a matter of academic debate. What is known is that in 928 A.D. King Jayavarman IV, possibly a usurper to the throne, created a new capital 100km away at Koh Ker, either moving the capital city from Angkor or creating a rival capital. Obviously a king of much wealth and power, he raised an impressive royal city at Koh Ker of Brahmanic monuments, temples and prasats, surrounding a huge baray (reservoir) Rahal. Jayavarman IV reigned at Koh Ker for 20 years before he died in 941 A.D. His son Hashavarman II would remain at Koh Ker for another 3 years before returning the capital to the Angkor area. The monuments of Koh Ker are now on a road loop around the baray past the most important temples. The premier ruin of the complex is Prasat Thom, an imposing 7-tiered pyramid and temple complex. (Best photographed in the morning and offering a bird’s eye view from the top.) As you round the loop, there are several nicely preserved ruins sit just off the road, impressive prasats and small temple complexes. There are lingas still in place in some monuments such as Prasat Balang and Prasat Thneng. For the enthusiast, there are also dozens of other, more remote ruins in the area. A good guide can be most helpful at Koh Ker. A trip to Koh Ker takes the better part of a day out of Siem Reap and is usually combined with a visit to Beng Melea. To get there take Route #6 east from Siem Reap to Damdek. Turn north and follow the signs. Part of the way is a toll road. Check road conditions before leaving Siem Reap, especially in the wet season. $5 entrance fee to Koh Ker.

Shooting Range

The shooting range in siem reap is running by commander of Para-suite military operating training military place with many real types of gun for shooting to digit or you can buy a duck and cow for shooting. also all the money we got use it for project of military food and weapon for training ,it is good to see and try for one magazine like ak47 or hand grenade and M16 or Tommy gun. 
 

 

 
TESTIMONIALS

Dear Hak,

Dr. D and myself are safely back in K.L.

We are very happy with the trip, especially with your service. You were always punctual and informative about the places you took us.

God bless you always. Will meet you again with my son next year November.

Regards.

andrew

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